» » Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok

    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok


    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




    Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok


    A baby elephant tries to grab some food off a cart along the city streets September 25, 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. While the elephant is a symbol of Thailand, it is a fairly common site to see the unemployed and homeless animals roaming the city streets begging for food. The tame elephants dodge the traffic as their mahouts (elephant drivers) sell sugar cane by the bag to tourists who then feed them. Mahouts say that they have little choice but to bring their elephants to cities like Bangkok and Chiang Mai. Thai officials frown upon the practice and have passed laws banning elephants from roadways but the mahouts still come risking fines in order to survive. Elephants have been big business for the country for centuries but now they are reduced to a major tourist attraction. Elephants are trained to paint, play musical instruments, and even kick soccer balls. In addition there are elephant camps dotted all over Thailand catering to tourists employing up to 650 pachyderms, according to government figures. The Tourism Authority of Thailand says that about 65 percent of tourists will visit an elephant during their stay. Until Thailand banned logging in 1989, many Asian elephants were laborers working in the jungles. (Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)




    Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




    Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




    Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




    Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand


    Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp September 26, 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. (Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


    Add Comments
    Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

    It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..

Advertisements:

photo news
Advertisements



Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok


Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok




Urban Elephants Roam The Streets of Bangkok


A baby elephant tries to grab some food off a cart along the city streets September 25, 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. While the elephant is a symbol of Thailand, it is a fairly common site to see the unemployed and homeless animals roaming the city streets begging for food. The tame elephants dodge the traffic as their mahouts (elephant drivers) sell sugar cane by the bag to tourists who then feed them. Mahouts say that they have little choice but to bring their elephants to cities like Bangkok and Chiang Mai. Thai officials frown upon the practice and have passed laws banning elephants from roadways but the mahouts still come risking fines in order to survive. Elephants have been big business for the country for centuries but now they are reduced to a major tourist attraction. Elephants are trained to paint, play musical instruments, and even kick soccer balls. In addition there are elephant camps dotted all over Thailand catering to tourists employing up to 650 pachyderms, according to government figures. The Tourism Authority of Thailand says that about 65 percent of tourists will visit an elephant during their stay. Until Thailand banned logging in 1989, many Asian elephants were laborers working in the jungles. (Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)




Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand




Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp in Bangkok, Thailand


Sangworn, a mahout (elephant driver), sits with his elephant, Bussaba, 13 years old, at his temporary camp September 26, 2008 in Bangkok, Thailand. (Photo Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..