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    Thai Elephants Get Treated At World's Only Elephant Hospital


    Elephant Hospital


    Boon Mee an 11 year old elephant suffers from a severe wound on his front foot from a land mine injury at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital


    A mahout tries to disinfect Boon Mees wounded foot with some iodine at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. Boon Mee, 11, suffers from a severe wound on his front foot from stepping on a land mine near the Burma border 10 months ago and still needs daily medical care and cannot lay down. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital




    Elephant Hospital


    Kittiya, a Veterinarian student at Chiang Mai University shakes de-worming powder on Boon Mees wounded foot at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in ampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital


    Daw Boon gets his intravenous fluids adjusted by a mahout while suffering from a stomach virus at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital


    Mokay Dee,19, is treated for her infected stomach wound by a team of mahouts along with Kittaya (Center) and Suchada (right) who are both volunteer Veterinarian students from Chiang Mai University at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital




    Elephant Hospital




    Elephant Hospital


    Mokay Dee,19, is treated for her infected stomach wound by Kittaya (Center) and Suchada (right) who are both volunteer Veterinarian students from Chiang Mai University at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital


    A mahout removes the prosthetic from Motala, age 50, at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve August 29, 2011 Lampang,Thailand. Motala lost a foot many years back after stepping on a land mine and now is on her third prosthetic, as they need to be changed according to the weight of the elephant. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)




    Elephant Hospital




    Elephant Hospital




    Elephant Hospital



    Motala, age 50, stands in the afternoon sun with the new prosthetic made for her at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve August 29, 2011 Lampang,Thailand. The worlds first elephant hospital assists in medical care and helps to promote a better understanding of the elephants physiology, important in treating them for illness. For generations elephants have been a part of the Thai culture, although today the Thai elephant mostly is domesticated animal, since Thailand now has few working elephants. Many are used in the tourism sector at special elephant parks or zoos, where they perform in shows. In some cases Thailand is still deals with roaming elephants on the city streets, usually after the mahout, an elephant driver, becomes unemployed, which often causes the elephant serious stress. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


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Thai Elephants Get Treated At World's Only Elephant Hospital


Elephant Hospital


Boon Mee an 11 year old elephant suffers from a severe wound on his front foot from a land mine injury at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital


A mahout tries to disinfect Boon Mees wounded foot with some iodine at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. Boon Mee, 11, suffers from a severe wound on his front foot from stepping on a land mine near the Burma border 10 months ago and still needs daily medical care and cannot lay down. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital




Elephant Hospital


Kittiya, a Veterinarian student at Chiang Mai University shakes de-worming powder on Boon Mees wounded foot at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in ampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital


Daw Boon gets his intravenous fluids adjusted by a mahout while suffering from a stomach virus at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital


Mokay Dee,19, is treated for her infected stomach wound by a team of mahouts along with Kittaya (Center) and Suchada (right) who are both volunteer Veterinarian students from Chiang Mai University at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital




Elephant Hospital




Elephant Hospital


Mokay Dee,19, is treated for her infected stomach wound by Kittaya (Center) and Suchada (right) who are both volunteer Veterinarian students from Chiang Mai University at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve on August 28, 2011 in Lampang, Thailand. (Photo by Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital


A mahout removes the prosthetic from Motala, age 50, at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve August 29, 2011 Lampang,Thailand. Motala lost a foot many years back after stepping on a land mine and now is on her third prosthetic, as they need to be changed according to the weight of the elephant. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)




Elephant Hospital




Elephant Hospital




Elephant Hospital



Motala, age 50, stands in the afternoon sun with the new prosthetic made for her at the Friends of the Asian Elephant (FAE) elephant hospital in the Mae Yao National Reserve August 29, 2011 Lampang,Thailand. The worlds first elephant hospital assists in medical care and helps to promote a better understanding of the elephants physiology, important in treating them for illness. For generations elephants have been a part of the Thai culture, although today the Thai elephant mostly is domesticated animal, since Thailand now has few working elephants. Many are used in the tourism sector at special elephant parks or zoos, where they perform in shows. In some cases Thailand is still deals with roaming elephants on the city streets, usually after the mahout, an elephant driver, becomes unemployed, which often causes the elephant serious stress. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)


Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..