» » Oklahoma Residents Return to Survey Tornado Damage

    Oklahoma Residents Return to Survey Tornado Damage


    Rae Kittrell holds her son Rylan, who turned one-year-old today, a block away from her house in Moore, Oklahoma, two days after the Oklahoma City suburb was left devastated by a tornado on May 22, 2013. Kittrell's house survived the tornado. Tornado survivors thanked God, sturdy closets and luck in explaining how they lived through the colossal twister that devastated an Oklahoma town and killed 24 people, an astonishingly low toll given the extent of destruction. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


    Rae Kittrell holds her son Rylan, who turned one-year-old today, a block away from her house in Moore, Oklahoma, two days after the Oklahoma City suburb was left devastated by a tornado on May 22, 2013. Kittrell's house survived the tornado. Tornado survivors thanked God, sturdy closets and luck in explaining how they lived through the colossal twister that devastated an Oklahoma town and killed 24 people, an astonishingly low toll given the extent of destruction. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




    Debris is scattered around damaged playground equipment outside the Plaza Towers elementary school, where seven children died in a tornado, in Moore, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


    Debris is scattered around damaged playground equipment outside the Plaza Towers elementary school, where seven children died in a tornado, in Moore, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




    Jackie Watkins shows the storm shelter she and five members of her family survived the tornado May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The two-mile-wide Category 5 tornado touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Brett Deering/AFP Photo)


    Jackie Watkins shows the storm shelter she and five members of her family survived the tornado May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The two-mile-wide Category 5 tornado touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Brett Deering/AFP Photo)




    Lean Newbury holds up a picture of her father's home (rear) before it was destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)


    Lean Newbury holds up a picture of her father's home (rear) before it was destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)




    An aerial view of damage to neighborhoods in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013, seen in the aftermath of a tornado which ravaged the suburb of Oklahoma City. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and survivors picked through the rubble of their shattered homes on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out blocks of houses and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


    An aerial view of damage to neighborhoods in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013, seen in the aftermath of a tornado which ravaged the suburb of Oklahoma City. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and survivors picked through the rubble of their shattered homes on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out blocks of houses and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




    Resident Taylor Tennyson sits in the front yard as family members salvage the remains from their home which was left devastated by a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through a suburb of Oklahoma City, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


    Resident Taylor Tennyson sits in the front yard as family members salvage the remains from their home which was left devastated by a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




    A teddy bear salvaged from the rubble of a tornado-destroyed home sits on the boot of a vehicle, in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


    A teddy bear salvaged from the rubble of a tornado-destroyed home sits on the boot of a vehicle, in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




    People salvage belongings at a tornado devastated home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


    People salvage belongings at a tornado devastated home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)




    Kriket Krekemeyer cries while cleaning up her tornado-ravaged home in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. (Photo by Mike Simons/AP Photo/Tulsa World)


    Kriket Krekemeyer cries while cleaning up her tornado-ravaged home in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. (Photo by Mike Simons/AP Photo/Tulsa World)




    In this aerial photo, a person, lower right, stand in front of a home demolished home by Monday's tornado, in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo)


    In this aerial photo, a person, lower right, stand in front of a home demolished home by Monday's tornado, in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo)




    A pile of destroyed cars of teachers sits outside Briarwood elementary school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. Curvature of horizon in the photo is due to an ultra-wide angle lens. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


    A pile of destroyed cars of teachers sits outside Briarwood elementary school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. Curvature of horizon in the photo is due to an ultra-wide angle lens. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




    Amber Ford, a teaching assistant, goes through the rubble of a second grade classroom she works in at the Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, Okla. Tuesday, May 21, 2013. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City area Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying the elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Michael Wyke/AP Photo/Tulsa World)


    Amber Ford, a teaching assistant, goes through the rubble of a second grade classroom she works in at the Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, Okla. Tuesday, May 21, 2013. (Photo by Michael Wyke/AP Photo/Tulsa World)




    Danielle Stephan holds boyfriend Thomas Layton as they pause between salvaging through the remains of a family member's home one day after a tornado devastated the town Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


    Danielle Stephan holds boyfriend Thomas Layton as they pause between salvaging through the remains of a family member's home one day after a tornado devastated the town Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




    Sarah Dick reads a Doctor Seuss book to her three-year-old daughter Jadyn at the driveway of her tornado-destroyed house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


    Sarah Dick reads a Doctor Seuss book to her three-year-old daughter Jadyn at the driveway of her tornado-destroyed house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




    John Wilson surveys the neighborhood from atop the rubble that was once a home that his son and ex-wife shared before the home and the neighborhood were destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)


    John Wilson surveys the neighborhood from atop the rubble that was once a home that his son and ex-wife shared before the home and the neighborhood were destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)




    Plaza Towers Elementary School students Monica Boyd (L) and Lavontey Rodriguez sit at the parking lot of their tornado devastated school on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Seven children died in the school during the tornado. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


    Plaza Towers Elementary School students Monica Boyd (L) and Lavontey Rodriguez sit at the parking lot of their tornado devastated school on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Seven children died in the school during the tornado. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


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Oklahoma Residents Return to Survey Tornado Damage


Rae Kittrell holds her son Rylan, who turned one-year-old today, a block away from her house in Moore, Oklahoma, two days after the Oklahoma City suburb was left devastated by a tornado on May 22, 2013. Kittrell's house survived the tornado. Tornado survivors thanked God, sturdy closets and luck in explaining how they lived through the colossal twister that devastated an Oklahoma town and killed 24 people, an astonishingly low toll given the extent of destruction. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


Rae Kittrell holds her son Rylan, who turned one-year-old today, a block away from her house in Moore, Oklahoma, two days after the Oklahoma City suburb was left devastated by a tornado on May 22, 2013. Kittrell's house survived the tornado. Tornado survivors thanked God, sturdy closets and luck in explaining how they lived through the colossal twister that devastated an Oklahoma town and killed 24 people, an astonishingly low toll given the extent of destruction. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




Debris is scattered around damaged playground equipment outside the Plaza Towers elementary school, where seven children died in a tornado, in Moore, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


Debris is scattered around damaged playground equipment outside the Plaza Towers elementary school, where seven children died in a tornado, in Moore, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




Jackie Watkins shows the storm shelter she and five members of her family survived the tornado May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The two-mile-wide Category 5 tornado touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Brett Deering/AFP Photo)


Jackie Watkins shows the storm shelter she and five members of her family survived the tornado May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The two-mile-wide Category 5 tornado touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Brett Deering/AFP Photo)




Lean Newbury holds up a picture of her father's home (rear) before it was destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)


Lean Newbury holds up a picture of her father's home (rear) before it was destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)




An aerial view of damage to neighborhoods in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013, seen in the aftermath of a tornado which ravaged the suburb of Oklahoma City. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and survivors picked through the rubble of their shattered homes on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out blocks of houses and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


An aerial view of damage to neighborhoods in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013, seen in the aftermath of a tornado which ravaged the suburb of Oklahoma City. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and survivors picked through the rubble of their shattered homes on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out blocks of houses and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




Resident Taylor Tennyson sits in the front yard as family members salvage the remains from their home which was left devastated by a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday, a day after a massive tornado tore through a suburb of Oklahoma City, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


Resident Taylor Tennyson sits in the front yard as family members salvage the remains from their home which was left devastated by a tornado in Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




A teddy bear salvaged from the rubble of a tornado-destroyed home sits on the boot of a vehicle, in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


A teddy bear salvaged from the rubble of a tornado-destroyed home sits on the boot of a vehicle, in Moore, Oklahoma May 21, 2013. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




People salvage belongings at a tornado devastated home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


People salvage belongings at a tornado devastated home on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)




Kriket Krekemeyer cries while cleaning up her tornado-ravaged home in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. (Photo by Mike Simons/AP Photo/Tulsa World)


Kriket Krekemeyer cries while cleaning up her tornado-ravaged home in Moore, Okla., Wednesday, May 22, 2013. (Photo by Mike Simons/AP Photo/Tulsa World)




In this aerial photo, a person, lower right, stand in front of a home demolished home by Monday's tornado, in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo)


In this aerial photo, a person, lower right, stand in front of a home demolished home by Monday's tornado, in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, May 21, 2013. The huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City suburb Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying an elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP Photo)




A pile of destroyed cars of teachers sits outside Briarwood elementary school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. Curvature of horizon in the photo is due to an ultra-wide angle lens. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


A pile of destroyed cars of teachers sits outside Briarwood elementary school in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. Curvature of horizon in the photo is due to an ultra-wide angle lens. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




Amber Ford, a teaching assistant, goes through the rubble of a second grade classroom she works in at the Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, Okla. Tuesday, May 21, 2013. A huge tornado roared through the Oklahoma City area Monday, flattening entire neighborhoods and destroying the elementary school with a direct blow as children and teachers huddled against winds. (Photo by Michael Wyke/AP Photo/Tulsa World)


Amber Ford, a teaching assistant, goes through the rubble of a second grade classroom she works in at the Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, Okla. Tuesday, May 21, 2013. (Photo by Michael Wyke/AP Photo/Tulsa World)




Danielle Stephan holds boyfriend Thomas Layton as they pause between salvaging through the remains of a family member's home one day after a tornado devastated the town Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. Rescuers went building to building in search of victims and thousands of survivors were homeless on Tuesday after a massive tornado tore through the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore, wiping out whole blocks of homes and killing at least 24 people. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)


Danielle Stephan holds boyfriend Thomas Layton as they pause between salvaging through the remains of a family member's home one day after a tornado devastated the town Moore, Oklahoma, in the outskirts of Oklahoma City May 21, 2013. (Photo by Adrees Latif/Reuters)




Sarah Dick reads a Doctor Seuss book to her three-year-old daughter Jadyn at the driveway of her tornado-destroyed house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. Rescue workers with sniffer dogs picked through the ruins on Wednesday to ensure no survivors remained buried after a deadly tornado left thousands homeless and trying to salvage what was left of their belongings. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)


Sarah Dick reads a Doctor Seuss book to her three-year-old daughter Jadyn at the driveway of her tornado-destroyed house in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma May 22, 2013. (Photo by Rick Wilking/Reuters)




John Wilson surveys the neighborhood from atop the rubble that was once a home that his son and ex-wife shared before the home and the neighborhood were destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)


John Wilson surveys the neighborhood from atop the rubble that was once a home that his son and ex-wife shared before the home and the neighborhood were destroyed by a tornado that ripped through the area on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. The tornado of at least EF4 strength and two miles wide touched down May 20 killing at least 24 people and leaving behind extensive damage to homes and businesses. U.S. President Barack Obama promised federal aid to supplement state and local recovery efforts. (Photo by Scott Olson/AFP Photo)




Plaza Towers Elementary School students Monica Boyd (L) and Lavontey Rodriguez sit at the parking lot of their tornado devastated school on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Seven children died in the school during the tornado. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


Plaza Towers Elementary School students Monica Boyd (L) and Lavontey Rodriguez sit at the parking lot of their tornado devastated school on May 22, 2013 in Moore, Oklahoma. Seven children died in the school during the tornado. As rescue efforts in Oklahoma wound down, residents turned to the daunting task of rebuilding a US heartland community shattered by a vast tornado that killed at least 24 people. The epic twister, two miles (three kilometers) across, flattened block after block of homes as it struck mid-afternoon on May 20, hurling cars through the air, downing power lines and setting off localized fires in a 45-minute rampage. (Photo by Jewel Samad/AFP Photo)


Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

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