» » A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt Part 1

    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt Part 1


    With temperatures soaring and summer well underway, countless Americans will be spending their Independence Day weekend at the beach. Here we revisit some classic images from the turn-of-the-century to the 1930's of vacations by the sea, from Coney Island to Santa Monica.

    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Parked automobiles crowd Nantasket Beach in Hull, Mass., for a Fourth of July weekend in the 1920s. (Getty Images)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Bathers swing along the ropes at Coney Island, 1900. During the early 20th century, Coney Island was a popular summer destination—200,000 postcards were once sent from the local post office on a single day. (Library of Congress)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    A couple sits on a log at the water’s edge in Far Rockaway in New York City's Queens borough, 1897. Men and women in day clothes take a stroll in the background. (Getty Images)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt



    Surfers ride the waves with ease at Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii, circa 1920s. (Getty Images)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Children wade into the surf near the Long Beach pier in 1905. The pier made up part of a larger amusement park called the Pike, which was closed in 1979 and demolished one year later. (Library of Congress)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    A young woman has a friendly chat with her swimming instructor at Midland Beach on Staten Island in New York City, circa 1898. (Getty Images)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Beachgoers enjoy the sun in Asbury Park, N.J. (Getty Images)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Passers-by stare out at the waves from the seawall in Galveston, Texas. The wall was built after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the deadliest in U.S. history. In 2008, it was breached by Hurricane Ike. (Library of Congress)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    Santa Monica’s Ocean Park bath house was built by Joseph Cather Newsom in 1905. With its distinctive Moorish architecture, the Ocean Beach bath house and other attractions along the shore made Santa Monica one of the most popular vacation destinations in California. (Library of Congress)


    A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


    In Palm Beach, Fla., a woman shields herself from the glare of the sun with a parasol. (Library of Congress)



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A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt Part 1


With temperatures soaring and summer well underway, countless Americans will be spending their Independence Day weekend at the beach. Here we revisit some classic images from the turn-of-the-century to the 1930's of vacations by the sea, from Coney Island to Santa Monica.

A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Parked automobiles crowd Nantasket Beach in Hull, Mass., for a Fourth of July weekend in the 1920s. (Getty Images)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Bathers swing along the ropes at Coney Island, 1900. During the early 20th century, Coney Island was a popular summer destination—200,000 postcards were once sent from the local post office on a single day. (Library of Congress)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


A couple sits on a log at the water’s edge in Far Rockaway in New York City's Queens borough, 1897. Men and women in day clothes take a stroll in the background. (Getty Images)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt



Surfers ride the waves with ease at Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, Hawaii, circa 1920s. (Getty Images)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Children wade into the surf near the Long Beach pier in 1905. The pier made up part of a larger amusement park called the Pike, which was closed in 1979 and demolished one year later. (Library of Congress)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


A young woman has a friendly chat with her swimming instructor at Midland Beach on Staten Island in New York City, circa 1898. (Getty Images)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Beachgoers enjoy the sun in Asbury Park, N.J. (Getty Images)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Passers-by stare out at the waves from the seawall in Galveston, Texas. The wall was built after the Galveston Hurricane of 1900, the deadliest in U.S. history. In 2008, it was breached by Hurricane Ike. (Library of Congress)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


Santa Monica’s Ocean Park bath house was built by Joseph Cather Newsom in 1905. With its distinctive Moorish architecture, the Ocean Beach bath house and other attractions along the shore made Santa Monica one of the most popular vacation destinations in California. (Library of Congress)


A Summer Activity time Can't Touch By William Holt


In Palm Beach, Fla., a woman shields herself from the glare of the sun with a parasol. (Library of Congress)



Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..