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    Brazil Calls in Army to Defuse Conflicts Over Indian Lands


    [President Dilma Rousseff's government said on Tuesday it would send 110 federal troops to the Brazilian farm state of Mato Grosso do Sul to try to prevent more violence between Indians claiming their ancestral territory and ranchers.

    The government has been struggling to defuse tensions with indigenous tribes over farmland in several states as well as over hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. Tensions escalated in a disputed property in Mato Grosso do Sul that was invaded last week for a second time by Terena Indians angered by the fatal shooting of one of their tribe's members. Local media said the man's cousin was shot and injured on a nearby ranch on Tuesday.

    [We must avoid radicalizing a situation that goes back a long way in Brazilian history], Justice Minister Jose Cardozo told reporters after meeting lawmakers from Mato Grosso do Sul in Brasilia. [We're not going to put out the flames by throwing alcohol on the bonfire], he said. However, protests have now erupted across the country]. – Cynthia Osterman and David Brunnstrom via Reuters


    Munduruku Indians do a dance around a Brazilian Air Force plane that transported them to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians do a dance around a Brazilian Air Force plane that transported them to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians, many of who are flying for the first time, board a Brazilian Air Force plane to fly to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Altamira June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians, many of who are flying for the first time, board a Brazilian Air Force plane to fly to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Altamira June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Munduruku Indians, many flying for the first time, ride in a Brazilian Air Force plane as they are transported to Brasilia for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians, many flying for the first time, ride in a Brazilian Air Force plane as they are transported to Brasilia for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Munduruku Indians, many of who had never been in a plane, disembark from a Brazilian Air Force plane as they arrive for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians, many of who had never been in a plane, disembark from a Brazilian Air Force plane as they arrive for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Munduruku Indians arrive at Planalto Palace after being transported from the Amazon region to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians arrive at Planalto Palace after being transported from the Amazon region to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Munduruku Indians pass through a metal detector as they arrive for a meeting with the Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Gilberto Carvalho, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Munduruku Indians pass through a metal detector as they arrive for a meeting with the Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Gilberto Carvalho, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil, Gilberto Carvalho (C), speaks to Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil, Gilberto Carvalho (C), speaks to Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    A Munduruku Indian child is pictured at the Planalto Palace, where a meeting with Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho was being held with other Munduruku Indians, in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    A Munduruku Indian child is pictured at the Planalto Palace, where a meeting with Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho was being held with other Munduruku Indians, in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




    Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho speaks with Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace to try to resolve the occupation of the construction of Belo Monte, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


    Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho speaks with Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace to try to resolve the occupation of the construction of Belo Monte, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


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Brazil Calls in Army to Defuse Conflicts Over Indian Lands


[President Dilma Rousseff's government said on Tuesday it would send 110 federal troops to the Brazilian farm state of Mato Grosso do Sul to try to prevent more violence between Indians claiming their ancestral territory and ranchers.

The government has been struggling to defuse tensions with indigenous tribes over farmland in several states as well as over hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. Tensions escalated in a disputed property in Mato Grosso do Sul that was invaded last week for a second time by Terena Indians angered by the fatal shooting of one of their tribe's members. Local media said the man's cousin was shot and injured on a nearby ranch on Tuesday.

[We must avoid radicalizing a situation that goes back a long way in Brazilian history], Justice Minister Jose Cardozo told reporters after meeting lawmakers from Mato Grosso do Sul in Brasilia. [We're not going to put out the flames by throwing alcohol on the bonfire], he said. However, protests have now erupted across the country]. – Cynthia Osterman and David Brunnstrom via Reuters


Munduruku Indians do a dance around a Brazilian Air Force plane that transported them to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians do a dance around a Brazilian Air Force plane that transported them to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians, many of who are flying for the first time, board a Brazilian Air Force plane to fly to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Altamira June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians, many of who are flying for the first time, board a Brazilian Air Force plane to fly to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Altamira June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Munduruku Indians, many flying for the first time, ride in a Brazilian Air Force plane as they are transported to Brasilia for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians, many flying for the first time, ride in a Brazilian Air Force plane as they are transported to Brasilia for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Munduruku Indians, many of who had never been in a plane, disembark from a Brazilian Air Force plane as they arrive for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians, many of who had never been in a plane, disembark from a Brazilian Air Force plane as they arrive for talks with the government, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Munduruku Indians arrive at Planalto Palace after being transported from the Amazon region to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. Air Force planes flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu River, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians arrive at Planalto Palace after being transported from the Amazon region to Brasilia for talks with the government, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Munduruku Indians pass through a metal detector as they arrive for a meeting with the Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Gilberto Carvalho, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Munduruku Indians pass through a metal detector as they arrive for a meeting with the Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency, Gilberto Carvalho, at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil, Gilberto Carvalho (C), speaks to Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil, Gilberto Carvalho (C), speaks to Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




A Munduruku Indian child is pictured at the Planalto Palace, where a meeting with Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho was being held with other Munduruku Indians, in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. The government flew 144 Munduruku Indians to Brasilia for talks to end a week-long occupation of the controversial Belo Monte dam on the Xingu river, a huge project aimed at feeding Brazil's fast-growing demand for electricity. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


A Munduruku Indian child is pictured at the Planalto Palace, where a meeting with Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho was being held with other Munduruku Indians, in Brasilia, June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)




Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho speaks with Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace to try to resolve the occupation of the construction of Belo Monte, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. President Dilma Rousseff's government sought on Tuesday to defuse mounting conflicts with indigenous groups over its decision to stop setting aside farm land for Indians and plans to build more hydroelectric dams in the Amazon. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of Brazil Gilberto Carvalho speaks with Munduruku Indians during a meeting at the Planalto Palace to try to resolve the occupation of the construction of Belo Monte, in Brasilia June 4, 2013. (Photo by Ueslei Marcelino/Reuters)


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