A Feral Africanis: a Wild Breed of Dog by Photographer Daniel Naudé


    [The Africanis is a landrace of South African dogs. It is believed to be of ancient origin, directly descended from hounds and pariah dogs of ancient Africa, introduced into the Nile Valley from the Levant. The Swahili name for the breed is umbwa wa ki-shenzi meaning common or mongrel or [traditional dog]. Africanis is also an umbrella name for all the aboriginal dogs in southern Africa.

    The Africanis Society of Southern Africa aims to conserve the Africanis as a landrace rather than develop it as a breed. The Africanis is recognized by the Kennel Union of South Africa (KUSA) as an emerging breed.

    The Africanis is a short-coated, medium-sized dog, well-muscled and slightly longer than tall. It can be of any colour and occasionally comes with a ridgeback. It is slenderly built, agile, supple, and capable of great speed.

    The Africanis is well disposed without being obtrusive: a friendly dog showing watchful territorial behaviour. The breed is independent and territorial, but highly trainable]. – Wikipedia


    Africanis 12. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 12. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 23. Richmond, Northern Cape, Jan. 28, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 23. Richmond, Northern Cape, Jan. 28, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 19. Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape, May 15, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 19. Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape, May 15, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 18. Murraysburg, Western Cape, May 10, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 18. Murraysburg, Western Cape, May 10, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 8. Barkly East, Eastern Cape, July 5, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 8. Barkly East, Eastern Cape, July 5, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 2. Strydenburg, April 1, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 2. Strydenburg, April 1, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 20. Petrusville, Northern Cape, April 19, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 20. Petrusville, Northern Cape, April 19, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 11. Murraysburg, Western Cape, Feb. 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 11. Murraysburg, Western Cape, Feb. 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



    Africanis 21. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 17, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


    Africanis 21. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 17, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)
    [related-news]
    Related News
    {related-news}
    [/related-news]
    Add Comments
    Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

    It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..

Advertisements:

photo news
Advertisements



A Feral Africanis: a Wild Breed of Dog by Photographer Daniel Naudé


[The Africanis is a landrace of South African dogs. It is believed to be of ancient origin, directly descended from hounds and pariah dogs of ancient Africa, introduced into the Nile Valley from the Levant. The Swahili name for the breed is umbwa wa ki-shenzi meaning common or mongrel or [traditional dog]. Africanis is also an umbrella name for all the aboriginal dogs in southern Africa.

The Africanis Society of Southern Africa aims to conserve the Africanis as a landrace rather than develop it as a breed. The Africanis is recognized by the Kennel Union of South Africa (KUSA) as an emerging breed.

The Africanis is a short-coated, medium-sized dog, well-muscled and slightly longer than tall. It can be of any colour and occasionally comes with a ridgeback. It is slenderly built, agile, supple, and capable of great speed.

The Africanis is well disposed without being obtrusive: a friendly dog showing watchful territorial behaviour. The breed is independent and territorial, but highly trainable]. – Wikipedia


Africanis 12. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 12. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 23. Richmond, Northern Cape, Jan. 28, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 23. Richmond, Northern Cape, Jan. 28, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 19. Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape, May 15, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 19. Graaff-Reinet, Eastern Cape, May 15, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 18. Murraysburg, Western Cape, May 10, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 18. Murraysburg, Western Cape, May 10, 2010. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 8. Barkly East, Eastern Cape, July 5, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 8. Barkly East, Eastern Cape, July 5, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 2. Strydenburg, April 1, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 2. Strydenburg, April 1, 2008. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 20. Petrusville, Northern Cape, April 19, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 20. Petrusville, Northern Cape, April 19, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 11. Murraysburg, Western Cape, Feb. 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 11. Murraysburg, Western Cape, Feb. 4, 2009. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)



Africanis 21. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 17, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)


Africanis 21. Richmond, Northern Cape, April 17, 2011. (Photo by Daniel Naudé)
[related-news]
Related News
{related-news}
[/related-news]
Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..