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    United States Capitol Subway System


    [The subway system of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. consists of three underground electric people mover systems that connect the United States Capitol to the House and Senate office buildings.

    The original subway line was built in 1909 to link the Russell Senate Office Building to the Capitol. In 1960, an operator-controlled monorail was installed for the Dirksen Senate Office Building. A two-car subway line connecting the Rayburn House Office Building to the Capitol was built in 1965. The Dirksen monorail, which had been extended to the Hart Senate Office Building in 1982, was replaced in 1993 by an automatic train]. – Wikipedia


    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate Monorail System, 1912]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate Monorail System, 1912]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. John W. Hinkel, Operator Of Car, 1914]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. John W. Hinkel, Operator Of Car, 1914]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car. Senators Swanson And Townsend As Passengers, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car. Senators Swanson And Townsend As Passengers, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    Senate Subway R.R., between 1920 and 1930]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    Senate Subway R.R., between 1920 and 1930]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    Senate Subway R.R., circa 1915]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    Senate Subway R.R., circa 1915]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)



    [No rail troubles here. Washington, D.C., February 10. Apparently no rail troubles in the Senate subway indicates Senator Burton K. Wheeler as he rides the tram car between the Senate office building and the Capitol. Senator Wheeler is Chairman of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee which is now studying the nation's railroad problems, February 10, 1939]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [No rail troubles here. Washington, D.C., February 10. Apparently no rail troubles in the Senate subway indicates Senator Burton K. Wheeler as he rides the tram car between the Senate office building and the Capitol. Senator Wheeler is Chairman of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee which is now studying the nation's railroad problems, February 10, 1939]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    [Senate Majority Leader takes a walk. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. Senate Majority Leader Alvin W. Barkley prefers to walk thru the Senate subway instead of using the tram car on his way to the opening of the special session on November 15, 1937]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Senate Majority Leader takes a walk. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. Senate Majority Leader Alvin W. Barkley prefers to walk thru the Senate subway instead of using the tram car on his way to the opening of the special session on November 15, 1937]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




    [Vandenberg rides alone to opening session of Senate. Washington, D.C., Jan. 3. Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Republican of Michigan, using the subway from his office to the Capitol today for the opening session of the 76th Congress. January 3, 1940]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


    [Vandenberg rides alone to opening session of Senate. Washington, D.C., Jan. 3. Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Republican of Michigan, using the subway from his office to the Capitol today for the opening session of the 76th Congress. January 3, 1940]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


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United States Capitol Subway System


[The subway system of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. consists of three underground electric people mover systems that connect the United States Capitol to the House and Senate office buildings.

The original subway line was built in 1909 to link the Russell Senate Office Building to the Capitol. In 1960, an operator-controlled monorail was installed for the Dirksen Senate Office Building. A two-car subway line connecting the Rayburn House Office Building to the Capitol was built in 1965. The Dirksen monorail, which had been extended to the Hart Senate Office Building in 1982, was replaced in 1993 by an automatic train]. – Wikipedia


[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate Monorail System, 1912]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate Monorail System, 1912]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. John W. Hinkel, Operator Of Car, 1914]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. John W. Hinkel, Operator Of Car, 1914]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car. Senators Swanson And Townsend As Passengers, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Monorail Subway, Capitol To Senate. The Car. Senators Swanson And Townsend As Passengers, 1916]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




Senate Subway R.R., between 1920 and 1930]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


Senate Subway R.R., between 1920 and 1930]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




Senate Subway R.R., circa 1915]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


Senate Subway R.R., circa 1915]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)



[No rail troubles here. Washington, D.C., February 10. Apparently no rail troubles in the Senate subway indicates Senator Burton K. Wheeler as he rides the tram car between the Senate office building and the Capitol. Senator Wheeler is Chairman of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee which is now studying the nation's railroad problems, February 10, 1939]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[No rail troubles here. Washington, D.C., February 10. Apparently no rail troubles in the Senate subway indicates Senator Burton K. Wheeler as he rides the tram car between the Senate office building and the Capitol. Senator Wheeler is Chairman of the Senate Interstate Commerce Committee which is now studying the nation's railroad problems, February 10, 1939]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




[Senate Majority Leader takes a walk. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. Senate Majority Leader Alvin W. Barkley prefers to walk thru the Senate subway instead of using the tram car on his way to the opening of the special session on November 15, 1937]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Senate Majority Leader takes a walk. Washington, D.C., Nov. 15. Senate Majority Leader Alvin W. Barkley prefers to walk thru the Senate subway instead of using the tram car on his way to the opening of the special session on November 15, 1937]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)




[Vandenberg rides alone to opening session of Senate. Washington, D.C., Jan. 3. Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Republican of Michigan, using the subway from his office to the Capitol today for the opening session of the 76th Congress. January 3, 1940]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


[Vandenberg rides alone to opening session of Senate. Washington, D.C., Jan. 3. Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, Republican of Michigan, using the subway from his office to the Capitol today for the opening session of the 76th Congress. January 3, 1940]. (Photo by Harris & Ewing Collection)


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