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    Anna May Wong – The First Chinese American Movie Star


    [Anna May Wong (January 3, 1905 – February 3, 1961) was an American actress, the first Chinese American movie star, and the first Asian American to become an international star. Her long and varied career spanned both silent and sound film, television, stage, and radio.

    Born near the Chinatown neighborhood of Los Angeles to second-generation Chinese-American parents, Wong became infatuated with the movies and began acting in films at an early age. During the silent film era, she acted in The Toll of the Sea (1922), one of the first movies made in color and Douglas Fairbanks The Thief of Bagdad (1924). Wong became a fashion icon, and by 1924 had achieved international stardom.

    Frustrated by the stereotypical supporting roles she reluctantly played in Hollywood, she left for Europe in the late 1920s, where she starred in several notable plays and films, among them Piccadilly (1929).

    She spent the first half of the 1930s traveling between the United States and Europe for film and stage work. Wong was featured in films of the early sound era, such as Daughter of the Dragon (1931) and Daughter of Shanghai (1937), and with Marlene Dietrich in Josef von Sternbergs Shanghai Express (1932).

    In 1935 Wong was dealt the most severe disappointment of her career, when Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer refused to consider her for the leading role in its film version of Pearl S. Bucks The Good Earth, choosing instead the German actress Luise Rainer to play the leading role. Wong spent the next year touring China, visiting her familys ancestral village and studying Chinese culture. In the late 1930s, she starred in several B movies for Paramount Pictures, portraying Chinese-Americans in a positive light. She paid less attention to her film career during World War II, when she devoted her time and money to helping the Chinese cause against Japan. Wong returned to the public eye in the 1950s in several television appearances as well as her own series in 1951, The Gallery of Madame Liu-Tsong, the first U.S. television show starring an Asian-American. She had been planning to return to film in Flower Drum Song when she died in 1961, at the age of 56.

    For decades after her death, Wong was remembered principally for the stereotypical [Dragon Lady] and demure [Butterfly] roles that she was often given. Her life and career were re-evaluated in the years around the centennial of her birth, in three major literary works and film retrospectives. Interest in her life story continues and another biography, Shining Star: The Anna May Wong Story, was published in 2009]. – Wikipedia


    1924: The evil associate played by Snitz Edwards discusses the Princess with Anna May Wong in The Theif Of Bagdad a flamboyant silent film which borrows from the arabian nights tales


    The evil associate played by Snitz Edwards discusses the Princess with Anna May Wong in [The Theif Of Bagdad] a flamboyant silent film which borrows from the arabian nights tales. Directed by Raoul Walsh for Douglas Fairbanks studio. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1924




    Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), the silent era film actress who appeared in Circle of ChalkThe Thief Of Baghdad


    Anna May Wong, 1929. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images)




    circa 1930: Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) surrounded by ominous shadows


    Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong surrounded by ominous shadows. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




    1928: American film star, Anna May Wong (1905 - 1961) in her London flat


    American film star, Anna May Wong in her London flat. (Photo by William Davis/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1928




    1935: American film star, Anna May Wong (1905 - 1961) poses with a cut rose


    American film star, Anna May Wong poses with a cut rose. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1935




    1935: Chinese-American film star, Anna May Wong


    Chinese-American film star, Anna May Wong. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1935




    1933: Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) the stage name of Wong Liu Tsong, the American-Chinese actress, also known as Butterfly Wu


    Anna May Wong the stage name of Wong Liu Tsong, the American-Chinese actress, also known as [Butterfly Wu]. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1933




    1937: Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), born Wong Liu Tsong, in the garden with her dog


    Anna May Wong, born Wong Liu Tsong, in the garden with her dog. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1937




    1935: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) wearing an Oriental-style costume and headdress


    American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong wearing an Oriental-style costume and headdress. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1935




    1928: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong aiming a spear at a cartoon sea lion


    American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong aiming a spear at a cartoon sea lion. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1928




    1928: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) sitting on the floor wearing a wrap


    American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong sitting on the floor wearing a wrap. (Photo by William Davis/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1928




    1928: American-Chinese film actress Anna May Wong wearing Oriental garb and hairstyle


    American-Chinese film actress Anna May Wong wearing Oriental garb and hairstyle. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1928




    1930: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong playing a guitar


    American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong [playing] a guitar. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




    1930: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) having her hair done


    American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong having her hair done. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




    1925: Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), in a film with actor Gaston Farquet


    Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong, in a film with actor Gaston Farquet. (Photo by H. Gartner/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1925


    Comments

    Anna May Wong personal relationships typically were with older Caucasian men, but California law forbid marriage between Asians and Caucasians until 1948. One of her white lovers offered to marry her in Mexico, but the couple's intentions became known and he backed off when his Hollywood career was jeopardized. Wong mused about marrying a Chinese man at times, but the Chinese culture held actresses to be on a par with prostitutes


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Anna May Wong – The First Chinese American Movie Star


[Anna May Wong (January 3, 1905 – February 3, 1961) was an American actress, the first Chinese American movie star, and the first Asian American to become an international star. Her long and varied career spanned both silent and sound film, television, stage, and radio.

Born near the Chinatown neighborhood of Los Angeles to second-generation Chinese-American parents, Wong became infatuated with the movies and began acting in films at an early age. During the silent film era, she acted in The Toll of the Sea (1922), one of the first movies made in color and Douglas Fairbanks The Thief of Bagdad (1924). Wong became a fashion icon, and by 1924 had achieved international stardom.

Frustrated by the stereotypical supporting roles she reluctantly played in Hollywood, she left for Europe in the late 1920s, where she starred in several notable plays and films, among them Piccadilly (1929).

She spent the first half of the 1930s traveling between the United States and Europe for film and stage work. Wong was featured in films of the early sound era, such as Daughter of the Dragon (1931) and Daughter of Shanghai (1937), and with Marlene Dietrich in Josef von Sternbergs Shanghai Express (1932).

In 1935 Wong was dealt the most severe disappointment of her career, when Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer refused to consider her for the leading role in its film version of Pearl S. Bucks The Good Earth, choosing instead the German actress Luise Rainer to play the leading role. Wong spent the next year touring China, visiting her familys ancestral village and studying Chinese culture. In the late 1930s, she starred in several B movies for Paramount Pictures, portraying Chinese-Americans in a positive light. She paid less attention to her film career during World War II, when she devoted her time and money to helping the Chinese cause against Japan. Wong returned to the public eye in the 1950s in several television appearances as well as her own series in 1951, The Gallery of Madame Liu-Tsong, the first U.S. television show starring an Asian-American. She had been planning to return to film in Flower Drum Song when she died in 1961, at the age of 56.

For decades after her death, Wong was remembered principally for the stereotypical [Dragon Lady] and demure [Butterfly] roles that she was often given. Her life and career were re-evaluated in the years around the centennial of her birth, in three major literary works and film retrospectives. Interest in her life story continues and another biography, Shining Star: The Anna May Wong Story, was published in 2009]. – Wikipedia


1924: The evil associate played by Snitz Edwards discusses the Princess with Anna May Wong in The Theif Of Bagdad a flamboyant silent film which borrows from the arabian nights tales


The evil associate played by Snitz Edwards discusses the Princess with Anna May Wong in [The Theif Of Bagdad] a flamboyant silent film which borrows from the arabian nights tales. Directed by Raoul Walsh for Douglas Fairbanks studio. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1924




Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), the silent era film actress who appeared in Circle of ChalkThe Thief Of Baghdad


Anna May Wong, 1929. (Photo by Sasha/Getty Images)




circa 1930: Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) surrounded by ominous shadows


Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong surrounded by ominous shadows. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




1928: American film star, Anna May Wong (1905 - 1961) in her London flat


American film star, Anna May Wong in her London flat. (Photo by William Davis/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1928




1935: American film star, Anna May Wong (1905 - 1961) poses with a cut rose


American film star, Anna May Wong poses with a cut rose. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1935




1935: Chinese-American film star, Anna May Wong


Chinese-American film star, Anna May Wong. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1935




1933: Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) the stage name of Wong Liu Tsong, the American-Chinese actress, also known as Butterfly Wu


Anna May Wong the stage name of Wong Liu Tsong, the American-Chinese actress, also known as [Butterfly Wu]. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1933




1937: Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), born Wong Liu Tsong, in the garden with her dog


Anna May Wong, born Wong Liu Tsong, in the garden with her dog. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1937




1935: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) wearing an Oriental-style costume and headdress


American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong wearing an Oriental-style costume and headdress. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1935




1928: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong aiming a spear at a cartoon sea lion


American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong aiming a spear at a cartoon sea lion. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1928




1928: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) sitting on the floor wearing a wrap


American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong sitting on the floor wearing a wrap. (Photo by William Davis/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). November 1928




1928: American-Chinese film actress Anna May Wong wearing Oriental garb and hairstyle


American-Chinese film actress Anna May Wong wearing Oriental garb and hairstyle. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). 1928




1930: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong playing a guitar


American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong [playing] a guitar. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




1930: American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961) having her hair done


American-Chinese actress Anna May Wong having her hair done. (Photo by General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1930




1925: Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong (1907 - 1961), in a film with actor Gaston Farquet


Chinese-American actress Anna May Wong, in a film with actor Gaston Farquet. (Photo by H. Gartner/General Photographic Agency/Getty Images). Circa 1925


Comments

Anna May Wong personal relationships typically were with older Caucasian men, but California law forbid marriage between Asians and Caucasians until 1948. One of her white lovers offered to marry her in Mexico, but the couple's intentions became known and he backed off when his Hollywood career was jeopardized. Wong mused about marrying a Chinese man at times, but the Chinese culture held actresses to be on a par with prostitutes


Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..