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    Jupiter's Satellites


    Jupiter's Satellites


    Gliding past the planet Jupiter, the Cassini spacecraft captures this awe inspiring view of active Io, Jupiters third largest satellite, with the largest gas giant as a backdrop, offering a stunning demonstration of the ruling planets relative size, April 20, 2001. The Cassini spacecraft itself was about 10 million kilometers from Jupiter when recording the image data. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




    Jupiter's Satellites


    The solar systems largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. Ganymede is larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto and Saturns largest moon, Titan. Both Ganymede and Titan have greater surface area than the entire Eurasian continent on our planet. Cassini was 26.5 million kilometers (16.5 million miles) from Ganymede when this image was taken. The smallest visible features are about 160 kilometers (about 100 miles) across. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




    Jupiter's Satellites


    The entire body of Moon-sized Io, as it casts a black shadow, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




    Jupiter's Satellites


    The solar systems largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




    Jupiter's Satellites


    NASA announced March 16, 2001 one last mission for the Galileo space probe which includes five more flybys of the moons of Jupiter viewed here in an composite image taken by the probe before a final plunge into the crushing pressure of the giant planets atmosphere planned for August 2003. Galileo has been orbiting Jupiter for more than five years and was launched in 1989. This [family portrait,] a composite of the Jovian system, includes the edge of Jupiter with its Great Red Spot, and Jupiters four largest moons, known as the Galilean satellites. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)


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Jupiter's Satellites


Jupiter's Satellites


Gliding past the planet Jupiter, the Cassini spacecraft captures this awe inspiring view of active Io, Jupiters third largest satellite, with the largest gas giant as a backdrop, offering a stunning demonstration of the ruling planets relative size, April 20, 2001. The Cassini spacecraft itself was about 10 million kilometers from Jupiter when recording the image data. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




Jupiter's Satellites


The solar systems largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. Ganymede is larger than the planets Mercury and Pluto and Saturns largest moon, Titan. Both Ganymede and Titan have greater surface area than the entire Eurasian continent on our planet. Cassini was 26.5 million kilometers (16.5 million miles) from Ganymede when this image was taken. The smallest visible features are about 160 kilometers (about 100 miles) across. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




Jupiter's Satellites


The entire body of Moon-sized Io, as it casts a black shadow, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




Jupiter's Satellites


The solar systems largest moon, Ganymede, is captured here alongside the planet Jupiter in this picture taken by NASAs Cassini spacecraft, December 3, 2000. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)




Jupiter's Satellites


NASA announced March 16, 2001 one last mission for the Galileo space probe which includes five more flybys of the moons of Jupiter viewed here in an composite image taken by the probe before a final plunge into the crushing pressure of the giant planets atmosphere planned for August 2003. Galileo has been orbiting Jupiter for more than five years and was launched in 1989. This [family portrait,] a composite of the Jovian system, includes the edge of Jupiter with its Great Red Spot, and Jupiters four largest moons, known as the Galilean satellites. (Photo courtesy of NASA/Newsmakers)


Add Comments
Bold Italic Underline Strike | Align left Center Align right | Insert smilies Select color | Add Hidden Text Insert Quote Convert selected text from selection to Cyrillic (Russian) alphabet Insert spoiler

It is forbidden to use not normative lexicon, insult other users of the site, active links to other sites, advertising in the comments..