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    Protecting the Turtles


    After midnight, a leatherback returns to the water having deposited her eggs on Singer Island. 322 leatherback nests were documented this year, and 100 of those were in Palm Beach County. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    After midnight, a leatherback returns to the water having deposited her eggs on Singer Island. 322 leatherback nests were documented this year, and 100 of those were in Palm Beach County. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A spotter with the Loggerhead Marinelife Center rides her ATV onto Juno Beach to search for nesting leatherback sea turtles. Each spring, the center dispatches biologists and technicians along an 11-mile stretch of beach between Jupiter Inlet and Lake Worth Inlet to document and research the critically endangered turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A spotter with the Loggerhead Marinelife Center rides her ATV onto Juno Beach to search for nesting leatherback sea turtles. Each spring, the center dispatches biologists and technicians along an 11-mile stretch of beach between Jupiter Inlet and Lake Worth Inlet to document and research the critically endangered turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A green turtle nests at the bottom of stairs leading to the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. Statewide, 25,553 green turtle nests were recorded on monitored beaches - more than twice the previous record, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which gathers turtle nesting data. Of those, 3,712 nests were on local beaches. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A green turtle nests at the bottom of stairs leading to the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. Statewide, 25,553 green turtle nests were recorded on monitored beaches - more than twice the previous record, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which gathers turtle nesting data. Of those, 3,712 nests were on local beaches. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A loggerhead turtle emerges from the ocean to nest while two boys fish near the Juno Beach Pier. On local beaches, there were 6,564 loggerhead nests. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A loggerhead turtle emerges from the ocean to nest while two boys fish near the Juno Beach Pier. On local beaches, there were 6,564 loggerhead nests. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A green turtle nests under a branch on Singer Island. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A green turtle nests under a branch on Singer Island. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Biologist Kelly Martin records her measurements of Electra, a 5 1/2 foot leatherback turtle nesting on the beach behind the Seminole Golf Club course in Juno Beach. Martin uses a red light which is invisible to turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Biologist Kelly Martin records her measurements of Electra, a 5 1/2 foot leatherback turtle nesting on the beach behind the Seminole Golf Club course in Juno Beach. Martin uses a red light which is invisible to turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A green turtle climbs out of her nest after depositing eggs on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A green turtle climbs out of her nest after depositing eggs on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A green turtle returns to the sea after nesting on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A green turtle returns to the sea after nesting on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A bird makes a meal out of a sea turtle egg after the surf uncovered a nest on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A bird makes a meal out of a sea turtle egg after the surf uncovered a nest on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Turtle eggs are exposed along the shoreline after high surf carved out the sand. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Turtle eggs are exposed along the shoreline after high surf carved out the sand. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A loggerhead hatchling emerges from its nest on the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A loggerhead hatchling emerges from its nest on the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A loggerhead hatchling crawls over shells as it makes its way to the ocean after hatching on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A loggerhead hatchling crawls over shells as it makes its way to the ocean after hatching on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A bird carries a hatchling in its mouth as the sun sets north of Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A bird carries a hatchling in its mouth as the sun sets north of Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Three loggerhead hatchlings crawl to the surf after emerging from their nest in Coral Cove Park. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Three loggerhead hatchlings crawl to the surf after emerging from their nest in Coral Cove Park. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Loggerhead Marinelife Center research technician Sara Thomas excavates a turtle nest in Coral Cove Park. Three days after a nest hatches out, technicians dig up the nests to free any turtle that didn't make it out, count the empty shells left behind and record the data. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Loggerhead Marinelife Center research technician Sara Thomas excavates a turtle nest in Coral Cove Park. Three days after a nest hatches out, technicians dig up the nests to free any turtle that didn't make it out, count the empty shells left behind and record the data. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Loggerhead hatchlings from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center wait to be released from a boat and onto the sargassum to ride the gulf stream north. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Loggerhead hatchlings from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center wait to be released from a boat and onto the sargassum to ride the gulf stream north. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    An albino green turtle hatchling waits to be released into the ocean. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    An albino green turtle hatchling waits to be released into the ocean. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Green turtle hatchlings wait to be released into the Altantic Ocean near Boca Raton. Coast Guard officials helped Melanie Stadler, a marine scientist with Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the sargassum. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Green turtle hatchlings wait to be released into the Altantic Ocean near Boca Raton. Coast Guard officials helped Melanie Stadler, a marine scientist with Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the sargassum. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    A green turtle hatchlings swims in a tank at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach after being rescued on the beach. It will be taken by boat to the Gulf Stream and released. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    A green turtle hatchlings swims in a tank at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach after being rescued on the beach. It will be taken by boat to the Gulf Stream and released. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Marine turtle specialist Melanie Stadler and David Anderson of the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the ocean off Boca Raton. The Coast Guard ferried 311 loggerhead and 194 green turtle hatchlings to be released into the sea. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Marine turtle specialist Melanie Stadler and David Anderson of the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the ocean off Boca Raton. The Coast Guard ferried 311 loggerhead and 194 green turtle hatchlings to be released into the sea. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




    Florida Atlantic University student Natasha Warraich holds a loggerhead turtle next to fellow student Genis Alvarado as they are photographed by underwater photographer Jim Abernethy during the release of loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings that were used in research projects in the marine biology program at FAU. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


    Florida Atlantic University student Natasha Warraich holds a loggerhead turtle next to fellow student Genis Alvarado as they are photographed by underwater photographer Jim Abernethy during the release of loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings that were used in research projects in the marine biology program at FAU. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


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Protecting the Turtles


After midnight, a leatherback returns to the water having deposited her eggs on Singer Island. 322 leatherback nests were documented this year, and 100 of those were in Palm Beach County. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


After midnight, a leatherback returns to the water having deposited her eggs on Singer Island. 322 leatherback nests were documented this year, and 100 of those were in Palm Beach County. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A spotter with the Loggerhead Marinelife Center rides her ATV onto Juno Beach to search for nesting leatherback sea turtles. Each spring, the center dispatches biologists and technicians along an 11-mile stretch of beach between Jupiter Inlet and Lake Worth Inlet to document and research the critically endangered turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A spotter with the Loggerhead Marinelife Center rides her ATV onto Juno Beach to search for nesting leatherback sea turtles. Each spring, the center dispatches biologists and technicians along an 11-mile stretch of beach between Jupiter Inlet and Lake Worth Inlet to document and research the critically endangered turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A green turtle nests at the bottom of stairs leading to the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. Statewide, 25,553 green turtle nests were recorded on monitored beaches - more than twice the previous record, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which gathers turtle nesting data. Of those, 3,712 nests were on local beaches. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A green turtle nests at the bottom of stairs leading to the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. Statewide, 25,553 green turtle nests were recorded on monitored beaches - more than twice the previous record, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which gathers turtle nesting data. Of those, 3,712 nests were on local beaches. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A loggerhead turtle emerges from the ocean to nest while two boys fish near the Juno Beach Pier. On local beaches, there were 6,564 loggerhead nests. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A loggerhead turtle emerges from the ocean to nest while two boys fish near the Juno Beach Pier. On local beaches, there were 6,564 loggerhead nests. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A green turtle nests under a branch on Singer Island. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A green turtle nests under a branch on Singer Island. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Biologist Kelly Martin records her measurements of Electra, a 5 1/2 foot leatherback turtle nesting on the beach behind the Seminole Golf Club course in Juno Beach. Martin uses a red light which is invisible to turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Biologist Kelly Martin records her measurements of Electra, a 5 1/2 foot leatherback turtle nesting on the beach behind the Seminole Golf Club course in Juno Beach. Martin uses a red light which is invisible to turtles. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A green turtle climbs out of her nest after depositing eggs on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A green turtle climbs out of her nest after depositing eggs on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A green turtle returns to the sea after nesting on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A green turtle returns to the sea after nesting on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A bird makes a meal out of a sea turtle egg after the surf uncovered a nest on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A bird makes a meal out of a sea turtle egg after the surf uncovered a nest on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Turtle eggs are exposed along the shoreline after high surf carved out the sand. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Turtle eggs are exposed along the shoreline after high surf carved out the sand. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A loggerhead hatchling emerges from its nest on the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A loggerhead hatchling emerges from its nest on the beach at Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A loggerhead hatchling crawls over shells as it makes its way to the ocean after hatching on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A loggerhead hatchling crawls over shells as it makes its way to the ocean after hatching on the beach in Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A bird carries a hatchling in its mouth as the sun sets north of Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A bird carries a hatchling in its mouth as the sun sets north of Coral Cove Park in Tequesta. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Three loggerhead hatchlings crawl to the surf after emerging from their nest in Coral Cove Park. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Three loggerhead hatchlings crawl to the surf after emerging from their nest in Coral Cove Park. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Loggerhead Marinelife Center research technician Sara Thomas excavates a turtle nest in Coral Cove Park. Three days after a nest hatches out, technicians dig up the nests to free any turtle that didn't make it out, count the empty shells left behind and record the data. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Loggerhead Marinelife Center research technician Sara Thomas excavates a turtle nest in Coral Cove Park. Three days after a nest hatches out, technicians dig up the nests to free any turtle that didn't make it out, count the empty shells left behind and record the data. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Loggerhead hatchlings from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center wait to be released from a boat and onto the sargassum to ride the gulf stream north. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Loggerhead hatchlings from Gumbo Limbo Nature Center wait to be released from a boat and onto the sargassum to ride the gulf stream north. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




An albino green turtle hatchling waits to be released into the ocean. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


An albino green turtle hatchling waits to be released into the ocean. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Green turtle hatchlings wait to be released into the Altantic Ocean near Boca Raton. Coast Guard officials helped Melanie Stadler, a marine scientist with Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the sargassum. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Green turtle hatchlings wait to be released into the Altantic Ocean near Boca Raton. Coast Guard officials helped Melanie Stadler, a marine scientist with Gumbo Limbo Nature Center, release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the sargassum. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




A green turtle hatchlings swims in a tank at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach after being rescued on the beach. It will be taken by boat to the Gulf Stream and released. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


A green turtle hatchlings swims in a tank at the Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach after being rescued on the beach. It will be taken by boat to the Gulf Stream and released. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Marine turtle specialist Melanie Stadler and David Anderson of the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the ocean off Boca Raton. The Coast Guard ferried 311 loggerhead and 194 green turtle hatchlings to be released into the sea. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Marine turtle specialist Melanie Stadler and David Anderson of the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center release almost 500 sea turtle hatchlings into the ocean off Boca Raton. The Coast Guard ferried 311 loggerhead and 194 green turtle hatchlings to be released into the sea. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)




Florida Atlantic University student Natasha Warraich holds a loggerhead turtle next to fellow student Genis Alvarado as they are photographed by underwater photographer Jim Abernethy during the release of loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings that were used in research projects in the marine biology program at FAU. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


Florida Atlantic University student Natasha Warraich holds a loggerhead turtle next to fellow student Genis Alvarado as they are photographed by underwater photographer Jim Abernethy during the release of loggerhead and green turtle hatchlings that were used in research projects in the marine biology program at FAU. (Photo by Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)


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